DAM Guru Program Says Goodbye to Linda Rouse

Linda Rouse

Longtime DAM Guru Program member and supporter Linda Rouse passed away on 11 March 2017.

Linda had been a valued member of the Digital Asset Management community for decades. As a formally trained librarian, she brought to the DAM industry a skill set that helped many DAM professionals understand the important connection between what they were trying to do and what librarians had already been doing for hundreds of years.

Linda was based in Cairns, Queensland, Australia, where she worked with longtime partner Ricky Patten at their company, DataBasics. During her time with the company, she helped countless organizations come to terms with the concept of managing content, and she authored a number of pieces that were well received throughout the DAM community.

Below is a sampling of Linda’s articles:

Linda did a GuruTalk profile on the DAM Guru Program website in 2015. In her profile, she describes her beginnings with DAM and offers advice for others new to the field.

Linda’s obituary was published in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Those who knew Linda knew her as a beacon of wisdom and happiness. One couldn’t help but feel energized by listening to her, or elevated in spirit, just by being around her. She was truly a wonderful human being who cared deeply about many things including, according to her Twitter profile, belly dancing.

Our best wishes are with Ricky, the DataBasics team and Linda’s friends and family.

David Diamond
Program Director
DAM Guru Program

Guru Talk: Jared Bajkowski – Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Jared Bajkowski - DAM ProfessionalIf you’ve ever wondered about the three R’s of digital asset management, Jared Bajkowski covers this and so much more in his DAM interview.

What companies/organizations have you worked for as a DAM professional? What was your role at each?

I’ve been the Digital Assets Manager at a large non-profit for four years. At the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, we fund scientific research at labs around the world—which means a lot of digital assets. Most people outside of science aren’t familiar with us, but we’re actually the second largest philanthropic organization in the United States. I am the institute’s first Digital Assets Manager, so my primary goal was to lay the groundwork for the policies and guidelines for current and future records. Once the DAM was established I oversaw the process of bringing the current records online while continuing to catalog new assets as they came in. Building a strategy and policy from the ground up was exciting to me (still is).

My day-to-day now is managing the flow of new photography, design files, research imagery, video clips, contracts, etc. into the system. Often I’m curating customized collections for media outlets, web developers, graphic designers, or colleagues as needed for internal and external production. I also manage the institute’s graphic identity within the DAM, so I often work directly with designers on appropriate usage of our assets.

How do you describe digital asset management to others?

DAM boils down to what others have called the three R’s: repository, reuse, and rights. Media is born digital these days and few organizations have physical file rooms anymore, so DAM is your digital vault keeping these items safe, centralized, and backed-up on your servers. Detailed metadata also makes it possible to quickly find items, eliminating potentially redundant photo or design projects. Finally, item records will make it clear what you do and don’t have copyright clearance for. Basically, a good DAM protects the money you’ve already spent, makes that money go farther, and guards against lawsuits.

How did you learn DAM? Any recommended sources?

When I first transitioned from being a librarian to a Digital Assets Manager, I found much of the underlying philosophy of cataloging and preservation familiar, with some different nuances. Learning new terminology and graphic design workflow was important, and local Meetup groups and conferences were important to help me catch up. I found Henry Stewart’s DAM New York conference and the Journal of Digital Media Management to be particularly helpful.

What’s the most important thing for someone new to DAM to understand about DAM?

What makes DAM go isn’t the technology or assets or policy (though they are important). What makes an effective DAM is user buy-in—never forget that. You could have the best system on the planet with perfect metadata, but it’s all worthless if your team isn’t using it. People need to see their work life getting easier with DAM around, and not just see it as more work. Talk to the team to identify the pain points in their workflow and then tailor your DAM to solve that problem. Solve peoples’ problems, and they’ll become your best evangelists for the system.

What was your biggest mistake with regard to DAM?

When the DAM was initially established, I was trying to standardized about five years’ worth of metadata from the old system. Previously there was no authority control so it was a bit like the wild west for metadata. Batch processing helped but trying to deal with this wealth of assets in a detailed manner was driving me crazy. Finally, under the advice of some DAM colleagues, I made my peace with the older assets and focused on the newer entries. This made sense since these were the assets people were actually using anyway. Focus on the present and future, and do what you can with the past.

What was your biggest success with regard to DAM?

Seeing people use the system outside my department was a thrill the first time I saw it happen. That’s when I knew all the training, meetings, outreach had worked. After all the hard work we put into it, seeing the DAM was out there in the wild, doing its job was a big moment for me.

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Guru Share: NJ DAM Meetup Recording – Metadata Automation

As part of the DAM Guru Program initiative to connect people and expand DAM education, we will be sharing deliverables from relevant DAM group events. The “Guru Share” is a way to expand DAM knowledge provided by peers, and promote the great content being discussed and dissected by these groups worldwide.

Our first share, a video recording of “Metadata Automation,” from the New Jersey Digital Asset Management Meetup from 14 Dec 2016. The impressive panel for this month’s virtual meetup included David Riecks, Mark Walter and Picturepark’s Peter Parker. Meetup organizers Deb Fanslow and Frank DiCarlo hosted the #LearnDAM event.

All organizers and panelists (except for Mr. Walter) are active members of DAM Guru Program.

Video recording of DAM Guru Program members, David Riecks, Spencer Harris and Picturepark’s Peter Parker, with Mark Walter, speaking on Metadata Automation from 12 December 2016 New Jersey DAM Meetup.

About the panelists

Peter Parker  is an experienced technology manager, DAM integration expert, and workflow evangelist who maintains a focus on providing real world solutions that enable users. He works for Picturepark in the United States, helping customers design and deploy systems. Connect with Peter Parker on LinkedIn.

David Riecks is a sought-after consultant on digital imaging and metadata. He is involved in recent standards initiatives, and has been a featured speaker at PhotoPlus Expo, Microsoft’s Pro Photo Summit and several of the International Photo Metadata conferences held at CEPIC. Riecks has appeared in the popular Picturepark webinars, DAM and the Tao of Taxonomy and The Copyright Killings. Connect with David Riecks on LinkedIn.

Spencer Harris offers more than eight years’ experience in development, analysis, processing and training of digital asset management solutions, workflows, and processes for small and large creative organizations. He offers a understanding of best practices related to hardware setup, taxonomy, keyword usage, and metadata structure. Connect with Spencer Harris on LinkedIn.

Mark Walter is a veteran consultant, analyst and marketer who has broad experience with content technologies in corporate and commercial publishing contexts. Walter has more than 20 years’ experience as a content/media/publishing technology analyst and consultant. Connect with Mark Walter on LinkedIn.

Guru Talk: Melissa Pauna – Gap Inc – Banana Republic

Melissa Pauna - Digital Asset ManagerSome of the best advice you’ll hear in the digital asset management space comes from Melissa Pauna. She has learned that derailments should not make one lose sight of the objectives, remaining tenacious and focusing on the big picture can lead to success in less than ideal DAM situations.

What companies/organizations have you worked for as a DAM professional? What was your role at each?

Having worked in a number of positions has provided a wonderful opportunity to understand how digital asset management (DAM) implementation, administration, and prioritization differs between sectors and even within industries.

Getty Center – I was involved in the first DAM roll-out pilot project that started in the Communications department to assist in fulfilling global press image requests. Once we had a handle on the tool and workflow, I met with representatives from around the Getty Center campus: Museum, Research Institute, Foundation, Conservation Institute. Incorporating these divisions was a gradual and systematic roll-out ensuring seamless integration. Metadata was vigilantly updated and maintained for each division as assets merged into a larger, unified, repository. You’ve never seen so much metadata until you work for a museum/library combo of this caliber!


MGA Entertainment – As the digital archivist for one of the largest privately owned toy companies in the US, I was responsible for distributing and archiving photography. I was part of a talented in-house photo studio team that shot the product lines for use on packaging and also distribution to retailers. My role working with the product photography brought me in contact with designers, sales, and the Hong Kong samples division to ensure images were available and up-to–date to keep Santa’s workshop functioning. It was here that I experienced my first DAM system migration and data cleanup!


SolutionSet – Originally Haggin Marketing, I was hired to manage a digital asset management team for a well-established Bay-area marketing firm. The firm was largely print (catalog) based when I first started. We set up a DAM platform that was used by internal creative, production, and pre-press teams. Eventually a  digital company was acquired to round-out service  offerings. My team handled the image asset management lifecycle from start to finish including processing photoshoots, creating FPO files, retouching, and finally distributing and archiving approved photography for print and digital. Because many of our clients didn’t have a DAM system of their own, I also set up mini-DAM hubs for our clients to use to access and manage their files, incorporating their brand-specific taxonomies.


Benefit Cosmetics – At this company I was hired to implement a newly purchased digital asset management (DAM) system for the marketing division with the intent to replace an existing system. After reviewing the vendor’s exploratory interviews with stakeholders, I advised a slight course adjustment regarding the ‘focus’ of the DAM and then we quickly set to work. The new system was fully operational in less than four months just in time for a global conference unveil. It included a complete taxonomy and hierarchy build, specialized metadata schemas, branded portal (HotDAM!) that provided assets to over 700 global partners, and also served as an asset share-back platform. After Phase 1, how-to videos were created and uploaded to provide self-serve learning between formal user trainings. Once I was able to hire an assistant, we had the opportunity to further expand the DAM creating a SKU-based search, and finally integrated a weekly newsletter that highlighted new assets and included DAM tips & tricks based on user feedback. The DAM and newsletter also supported an in–house feature film that was created about the founders and shown at the Cannes Film Festival. The film included a global road show, stopping at stores and meeting with press. Production and press assets were easily shared with the masses eager to learn how “Laughter is the best cosmetic…so grin and wear it!” – that is, once we figured how to handle super-sized video files!


Banana Republic – As the global marketing asset manager and creative technology advisor for the brand, I am the advocate for DAM and continually strive to impart the importance of best practices throughout the enterprise. I was the first asset manager hired at Gap Inc. and during my first few months conducted an inventory of the systems being used (there were a few!), noting where assets were being stored (so many places!), and trying to determine how to turn a grass-roots approach to DAM into conversations that revealed to leadership at various levels throughout the enterprise the business critical nature of DAM. At it’s core my role involves simplifying the asset management process for our internal and external teams in an environment that often involves dependencies between brands and involves multiple legacy systems. Add to the mix a newly purchased crowdfunded DAM system that isn’t exactly living up to the sales pitch and an exciting partnership with a third-party rights management vendor… It’s quite the puzzle and a perfect environment to test anyone’s DAM chops!

How do you describe digital asset management to others?

There’s the short answer and then the more complex one – it really depends on who the audience is. In my world DAM has involved a lot of inter-related bits coming together to form a whole: project and product management, taxonomy and hierarchy building, metadata modeling, change management, technical writing, help desk and reference desk, QC, trainer, and the list goes on.

I usually start by briefly describing what I do day-to-day by saying I manage a company’s digital and marketing assets, which includes images, videos and docs. These materials are stored in a system, then I determine who has access, apply rights info, and ensure assets are findable. At which point some people will say, “Oh, so you’re like a librarian!” and then I generally respond with a smile: sort of.

Early on in my career I managed library divisions and agree it does encompass some overlapping principles, and because I’m detailed-oriented (and a long-time fact-checker on the side), I know ‘librarian’ isn’t accurate or what I consider myself, even if the analogies can be helpful.

Digital asset management is an emerging new discipline. Just as there are many ways to manage assets, there are many ways people enter into this work. The longer one is in this space and experiences different methodologies, workflows, etc., it becomes clear that what one person considers digital asset management can vary greatly. Another fun question: What is a digital asset management system? This too can be tricky as I discovered while serving as a member of DAM selection committee.

How did you learn DAM? Any recommended sources?

My career in DAM began just as it was emerging. I have a multi-disciplinary Master’s and was studying interactive media in the 90s while working for archives and museums digitizing their collections. It was a highly innovative time when two worlds were merging and quickly evolving. Digitizing physical pieces and seeing them translated into digital files, and then taking those digital files and creating a digital experience was exciting. Largely, there weren’t any rules for how to manage this ‘new’ media.

In the professional space, museums, and later libraries, were taking the lead ensuring the information about their newly created and ever-growing digital collections was properly recorded, grappling with issues around standards and long-term permanence in both worlds. Meanwhile, in the creative space, artists and designers were at ground zero trying to figure out a number of potentially confusing topics: naming digital files, handling versions, verifying quality and proper format. Then there was storage and backup considerations. Processing digital files was often taxing for a computer which resulted in frequent crashes, hard drives filled up much faster than they do now, and for good or for bad, there weren’t clouds.

I started exploring the born digital space playing around with Photoshop and Illustrator, then experimenting with digital video, creating websites, interactive… It was a natural progression to take the knowledge I’d acquired with my hands-on physical collection experience using the organizational practices I’d developed through academic training and applying that to digital collections. I’ve found that having a creative and technical background turned out to be the perfect synergy for giving me a solid well-rounded foundation for understanding where this field came from and where it’s headed.

So even though I’ve been involved with DAM, or what it started as, for a couple decades, I stay inspired by keeping up with the latest technology trends, etc. This can be done via webinars and conferences. There are monthly webinars on a variety of topics – everything from the basics to vendor–specific product–focused sessions, all of which provide a way to make DAM less of a mystery. Whether attending a webinar or conference, fundamental best practices in DAM, many of which haven’t changed much in the past decade or so, are usually highlighted.

Attending a DAM conference can be a good way to network and interact with vendors. I never tire of the best practice reminders and always enjoy hearing war stories from peers, which provide a lot of great learning in themselves.

If you weren’t doing DAM as a career, what would you be doing?

Not have DAM as a career? It’s hard to imagine not being a part of this field in some way since I love organizing, managing, developing, advising… I’m passionate about the arts & cultural heritage. If I was no longer in the DAM space, front-and-center, I’d most likely be involved in something that incorporates my background and interests, such as protecting our architectural and cultural heritage, preserving our past, supporting the arts and artists.

What is your ongoing greatest challenge with DAM?

My answer to this would have been slightly less emphatic, but overall it’s keeping perspective! Currently I’m helping to identify short and long-term options as my team ponders the question ‘Is the juice worth the squeeze?’ with a new platform that was recently purchased enterprise-wide. Some of us saw early on in the RFI/RFP process that there would be significant challenges with the tool and vendor with the red flags now proving themselves. However, remaining tenacious while working through day-to-day challenges, always keeping the long-term goals in mind helps shake off frustrations. Not allowing derailments to make one lose sight of the objectives is what I advise others. After a year into a murky situation I try to remember my own advice and know that this too shall pass. The silver lining is truly great learning can arise from a less-than-ideal situation.

What was your biggest success with regard to DAM?

Partnership development has brought me great satisfaction over the years. Good partnerships are the key to a successful DAM experience at the most basic level whether it’s criteria gathering, implementation, or user adoption. At a larger level, engaging with vendors on their product roadmaps, working through system challenges together that lead to optimizing their system or service and improving the DAM experience at some level for the larger community, it is so much fun and extremely rewarding.

Recently I discovered a wonderful company that is pioneering the way rights management is handled in the DAM space. I met them at a DAM conference last year and was thrilled to see what they were up to given my background and vigilant interest in this topic. I could see they had an interesting model in place that would benefit many industries and was eager to chat with them about the product. A couple months later they reached out to see if my organization might be interested in piloting their product. A few months after that we participated in a Q&A session at Adobe Summit where they received recognition as one of the ‘Top 10 hottest DAM features for 2016’.

Learning and sharing is what keeps DAM interesting for me. So if there’s a way I can educate and also advance DAM to the next level, that’s success to me.

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Guru Talk: Mick Roovers – Rabobank

mick-rooversMick Roovers has been doing digital asset management for nearly ten years and understands the value a DAM can bring by having it serve as the backbone for an organizations’ content creation, management and publication processes.

What companies/organizations have you worked for as a DAM professional? What was your role at each?

I have been working for Rabobank, one of the largest all finance banks in the Netherlands and a global Food & Agri player, for almost 10 years. This entire period I have been working as a Digital Asset Management (DAM) professional, although I wasn’t aware that I was doing DAM in the first few years. I was working as a project manager on the brand portal and asset management seemed just one of the things that “needed to be done”. Currently I am responsible for the Marketing Asset Management of the entire organization. I will be leaving Rabobank within a few weeks, to join IntoAction – a digital marketing consultancy firm, to help other companies getting their Digital Asset Management done the right way.

How do you describe digital asset management to others?

Digital asset management is all about getting the right assets to the right people at the right time, by using a central platform for these assets. It involves three steps: creation, storage and distribution. Every step has influence on the other. To be able to distribute the assets, you must be able to find them in the storage, to be able to find them in the storage you must be able to upload the assets with the right metadata. To be able to upload the assets you must have workflows, authorizations, taxonomies in place etc.

How did you learn DAM? Any recommended sources?

Honestly, most of my digital asset management experience was learning-by-doing. Although there are a few recent publications I can recommend: “Digital and Marketing Asset Management” by Theresa Regli and “Metadata for Content Management” by David Diamond.

What’s the most important thing for someone new to DAM to understand about DAM?

First: a DAM is not solely a storage. It’s the backbone of your organizations content creation, management and publication processes. Second: don’t try to put everything in the DAM. Put your assets there that add value, that are (re)usable for yourself or others.

If you weren’t doing DAM as a career, what would you be doing?

Good question. I have no idea. I guess I would have found some other specialization in the field of digital marketing, or in the creative branch.

What is your ongoing greatest challenge with DAM?

The greatest challenge is the quality of the metadata. We don’t have a dedicated team to upload all the assets, this means every marketeer has the responsibility to upload his or her own assets. Most of the metadata is based on controlled vocabularies, but still, the quality of the metadata depends on the time and interest people take for it.

What is your vision for DAM? What will it look like in 5 years?

As I said earlier. A DAM has the potential to be the backbone of your organizations content creation, management and publication processes. With content marketing buzzing around and every company working on a content strategy, DAM is the tool to look at for executing this strategy throughout your entire organization. The DAM can be the central content hub, connected to creation and publication processes in the online and offline world. Maybe even integrating your PIM, DM, CRM, WCM and more.

What was your biggest mistake with regard to DAM?

Not knowing I was doing DAM.

What was your biggest success with regard to DAM?

Getting (almost) every employee of our company to work with our brand portal.

What more would you like to learn about DAM?

I really want to see more DAM implementations at other companies. How do they do it? How do they integrate it in their organizations? The perceived quality and adoption of the DAM is only as good as the way the product was implemented. I think we can learn a lot from each other in communities with DAM professionals.

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DAM Guru Program Adds Two New Managers

Carol Thomas-Knipes (left) and David Diamond (center) have joined Ben Smidt as DAM Guru Program Managers.

DAM Guru Program has added Carol Thomas-Knipes and David Diamond to its management team. Carol is a DAM and information professional with more than 20 years’ experience in the industry. She co-organizes the NYC DAM Meetup. David designed DAM Guru Program for Picturepark and authored the books, DAM Survival Guide and Metadata for Content Management. Carol and David join original program manager, Ben Smidt, to form the program’s new management team.

Ben will continue to serve as Operations Manager, as he has done since the program’s launch. Carol will be the program’s Content Manager, and David will serve as Program Director.

The larger team will be able to better handle the program’s rapid membership growth, while introducing new member services that were not previously possible, due to resource limitations.

The addition of the new managers was made possible by an increase of investment by DAM Guru Program creator and benefactor, Picturepark. You can read the official press release on the Picturepark website.

Guru Talk: Gregory Johnson – Governors State University

Gregory Johnson - DAM GuruGregory has extensive experience with multiple digital asset management systems. He has built them from scratch and also managed existing systems. Through these experiences he has learned to change his metadata mindset, to ensure all users of the DAM have success.

What companies/organizations have you worked for as a DAM professional? What was your role at each?

At Governors State University I managed two content repositories, building one from scratch (a nightmare). At Morgan Street Document Systems I worked as a Project Manager/Archivist and helped build “vaults” for our clients documents. At Masco Cabinetry I built the DAM program, collecting and culling more than 6tb of digital assets from multiple vendors in multiple states, local computers, and local servers.

How do you describe digital asset management to others?

I first compare the assets in the DAM to the physical assets around the building in terms of cost to show the need for DAM. I then explain the need for metadata in terms of searching and finding assets as well as the need for a strong DAM management program to keep the DAM running smoothly.

How did you learn DAM? Any recommended sources?

In graduate school I studies academic archival systems, so the transition to DAM wasn’t too difficult. I just needed to recognize that the assets in the DAM would be used by a far different type of end user, so I needed to change my metadata mindset.

What’s the most important thing for someone new to DAM to understand about DAM?

Without proper metadata even the most expensive, well-built, shiny new DAM is useless.

If you weren’t doing DAM as a career, what would you be doing?

I come from a library IT background, so I would probably be managing a library IT dept. that would have multiple content repositories, library systems, database and journal suites, and the hardware needed to run them.

What is your ongoing greatest challenge with DAM?

Right now, finding employment managing a DAM system. I was “re-organized” from my last position in another of the many changes of direction the company put into place.

What is your vision for DAM? What will it look like in 5 years?

Mobile use will finally be figured out. More seamless transition from content creators to the DAM will be realized. Prices will come down. And hopefully the importance of the position of DAM Manager will finally be realized.

What was your biggest mistake with regard to DAM?

Coupled with the answer for 9., being unable to convince that company about the need for a DAM management program. After I built our DAM the program was then crowd managed, which lead to the return of lost and un-findable assets due to the failure of the content creators/uploaders following the metadata schema. I was able to sell the need for the program, but in the end the desire to cut costs neutered the usefulness of the DAM.

What was your biggest success with regard to DAM?

Convincing a company that was very stuck in old school asset management to move their assets from various machines and servers into a DAM.

What more would you like to learn about DAM?

How to better use DAM at content creation that is done off site, i.e. photography, video, audio, etc.

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Guru Talk: Angie Taylor – Primrose Schools

Angie-TaylorAngie is brand new to the digital asset management industry, but armed with her recent certification in digital asset management, from The DAM Foundation, she already knows one important truth: DAM is a strategy.

What companies/organizations have you worked for as a DAM professional? What was your role at each?

I am currently the Marketing Coordinator at Primrose School Franchising Company. I received Digital Asset Management certification this May from The DAM Foundation and have been researching DAM platforms seriously for the past couple of months. Our marketing department is considering implementing a Digital Asset Management platform and strategy within our department that I would like to see scale up to benefit the entire company down the road. So, I’m in a very initial/beginner’s mode with DAM.

How do you describe digital asset management to others?

DAM is a strategy before its culmination in a platform of any kind. It is a great way to organize and implement strategic vision for any company.

How did you learn DAM? Any recommended sources?

I would highly recommend The DAM Foundation for anyone seeking certification or education about Digital Asset Management. There are two books that I’ve pored over that I would recommend as well: Digital Asset Management, Second Edition 2016 by Elizabeth Keathley and DAM Survival Guide – Digital Asset Management Initiative Planning by David Diamond.

If you weren’t doing DAM as a career, what would you be doing?

I would either be teaching private music lessons from home or working in accounting.

What is your vision for DAM? What will it look like in 5 years?

I would love to see DAM become THE central repository for every aspect of our company. For example, the operations department is implementing a system that lists FF&E for all of our schools in the franchising system, along with all of our operational policies and procedures. Also, our franchising department works with a system that allows them to connect to potential franchise owners and gives them a pipeline view of how these potential partners are tracking within our qualification process. These are just two examples I believe could be incorporated into a DAM strategy to help our company work a lot more efficiently in the future.

What more would you like to learn about DAM?

I would like to learn everything I can about Digital Asset Management and, especially, the future impact of DAM on business.

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Guru Call: Germany

gm-lgflagLooking for a Digital Librarian and/or Digital Asset Management professional in Germany. DGP member is seeking to fill a 6 month contract (on-site 3 days a week) with a Pharma company.

Company needs to manage the marketing content, in a regulated environment. Ability to speak to speak Germany and English very important.

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Guru Call: USA

USA FlagLooking for a Guru in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Member is seeking answers to questions about a specific digital asset management system provided by North Plains.

DGP member’s inquiry is about North Plains’ product called On Brand. They are looking to speak to those who have experience with this product.

Available DAM Guru members who are able to help may reach out to their program manager for more details.

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#GuruCall